Total 123 Years of Imprisonment For 8 People Active On Facebook In Iran

The Tehran Revolutionary Court, sentenced 8 men and women, active on Facebook to more than 123 years of imprisonment.

These 8 people were charged with assembly and collusion against the national security, insulting the Supreme Leader, insulting the authorities, propaganda against the regime, blasphemy, and spreading lies and disturbing the public’s peace.

According to the Kaleme website, these people who were arrested last year and were interrogated at the IRGC Ward 2-A in Evin prison, were tried and sentenced collectively to more than 123 years of imprisonment in Branch 28 of the Revolutionary Court presided by Judge Moghayeseh,.

The sentences issued by lower court are as follows:

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Turkey sentences Twitter user to jail for blasphemy

A Turkish court on Thursday sentenced a teacher to 15-month jail term over Twitter posts deemed religiously offensive,  Hurriyet newspaper reported on Thursday.

The court in the eastern city of Mus ruled that the man, identified as Ertan P., insulted Islamic values with his Twitter handle -- @allah (cc) -- and a series of tweets he posted.

He pretending to tweet as god: "In my present state of mind, I would not have created the little finger of human beings".

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The Brotherhood Will Be Back

WASHINGTON — After being ousted from power last July, Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, the Arab world’s original Islamist movement, faces an existential moment. The group has been targeted with extreme repression, prompting a wave of commentary about the failure — or even death — of political Islam.

Premature obituaries of the Brotherhood usually turn out to be just that. As early as 1963, the political scientist Manfred Halpern wrote that secular nationalism had triumphed over political Islam. Half a century later, the Brotherhood’s opponents hold out hope that President Mohamed Morsi’s demise wasn’t that of a man or an organization, but of a worldview. They point to the incompatibility of Islamism and democracy, an odd claim considering that it was the democratically elected Mr. Morsi who was overthrown by the army and not the other way around.

Mr. Morsi was a failure, and he was ousted with the backing of millions. He was stubborn, incompetent and failed to govern inclusively. But there is a different, deeper failure, one that is likely to plague the region for decades to come: the fundamental inability of secular state systems to accommodate Islamist participation in the democratic process.

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“Happy” Video Director Linked to Rouhani Campaign Remains in Detention

Sassan Soleimani, the director of one version of the ”Happy in Tehran” video, remains in Rajaee-Shahr Prison in Karaj where he is being deprived of sleep, days after six people who appeared in the video were released from detention, a source told the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran.

Soleimani, a 33-year-old filmmaker and animator, told Zendegi Ideal (Ideal Life) magazine in 2013 that when he was taking photos for Hassan Rouhani’s presidential election campaign, campaign officials asked him to suggest a color for campaign materials and he chose purple, which became Rouhani’s official color during the campaign.

Authorities had told Soleimani’s family that he could be released on bail but as of May 24 he was still in prison. The family was told to come back in one week for a visit.

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'Happy' video dancers, but not director, freed in Iran, group says

(CNN) -- Six people who were arrested in Iran for dancing in a YouTube video to Pharrell Williams' song "Happy" have been freed, the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran said Wednesday, citing a source close to the families.

The director of the video was not released, the group said.

One of the six announced that she was freed. "Hi I'm back," Reihane Taravati wrote on her Instagram account, thanking Williams and "everyone who cared about us."

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Saudi Arabia: Release Raif Badawi!

The International Association of Free Thought has learned with indignation of the increased criminal sanctions imposed against the Saudi liberal blogger Raif Badawi: ten years in prison, 1000 lashes and a fine of 1 million rials, for “insulting Islam.”

Saudi Arabia is a key part of the Western system of alliances in the region. Its allies do not burden themselves with the task of questioning this theocracy and its medieval practices.

In fact, the pronounced decree threatens all shades of freedom of expression since it considers as “terrorists” not only atheists, but also all those who dare to question the fundamentals of Islam as they form the basis of the Wahhabi monarchy. This can include Shiites, Sufis, Alawis, Ahmadiyya, indeed all Muslims, but also Christians and Hindus.

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Trial of a 15 years old teenager charged with " Blasphemy" in Erbil city, Iraqi Kurdistan

Father has complained against his 15 years old son in a court in Erbil, the capital of the Kurdistan Regional Government in North Iraq. His teenage boy would have a trial in June first for his criticism to religion.

Awina Website has reported that after Ahmad’s father has complained against his son, Asayesh (Police of Kurdistan Regional Government) has detained Ahmad for 13 days.

Ahmad has reported that the same night he was detained he was tortured by police.

Ahmad Shirvan who has chosen the name Amed Shirvan on his Facebook page and is a student in high school has been subject to violence by his father and Police because of his criticism to Islam in his page in Facebook.

Based on the report published in Awina website Ahmad’s father has taken the case to court in October 23, 2013 and Ahmad has been detained the same night and until November 4, 2013 he was under arrest.

Amed (Ahmad Shirvan) has told to Awina that he was tortured at the same night until 2 AM the next day.

Ahmad has told that when he was transferred to Erbil jail for teenagers he has been subject to violence by other prisoners and when the guards have seen the scene in the surveillance camera they have stopped the violence.

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